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Southeast Polk High School Library

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Safe Teens - Net & Cells

UN bringing child rights into the digital age
By Larry Magid In 1989 the United Nations passed an important human rights treaty. The Convention on the Rights of the Child (UNCRC) was ratified by all countries in the world except Somalia, Southern Sudan and — believe it or not — the … Continue reading Continue reading

UN committee brings child rights into the digital age
In 1989 the United Nations passed an important human rights treaty, the Convention on the Rights of the Child that was ratified by all countries in the world except the Somalia, Southern Sudan and — believe it or not — the United … Continue reading Continue reading

Teen Health and Wellness

Summer and Part-Time Jobs Give Teens an Edge
Did you spend your summer working? Good news! You likely improved your chances of attaining a good career. A study of 15-year-old Canadian students has found that working in the evening, on weekends, or over summer break gives teens a competitive advantage in the workforce. Researchers found that, even when working in low-paying jobs, teens gained valuable knowledge about the working environment, networking, and job hunting. Teens that held jobs during the school year developed useful time management skills as they learned to balance school, work, and their social lives. The benefits disappeared, however, when teens worked more than 33 hours per week.

World Suicide Prevention Day
September 10 is World Suicide Prevention Day. Suicide is a major problem among teens: 17 percent say they have seriously considered the act, and 8 percent have actually attempted suicide in the past year. According to the National Council for Suicide Prevention, more people around the world die from suicide than from war and murder combined. Suicide is preventable. Nine in ten people who complete suicide had a diagnosable and treatable psychiatric disorder, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Treatment is available for teens and adults. Learning to recognize the warning signs of suicide can save lives.

Largest Ebola Outbreak in History Strikes West Africa
The Ebola virus has caused more than 1,400 deaths in the West African nations of Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria in an ongoing outbreak that began in March. The virus causes Ebola hemorrhagic fever, a deadly illness that spreads through contact with the blood or bodily fluids of infected people. While Ebola is dangerous, with a death rate of up to 90 percent, it is not very contagious. Unlike the flu or the common cold, it is not spread through the air. Health officials, including experts at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, say Ebola does not pose a serious risk to America or Canada. While no vaccine exists for Ebola, doctors are testing experimental drugs that may prevent or halt future outbreaks.

August Is National Immunization Awareness Month
With the school year about to kick off, August is dedicated to immunization awareness. Several important vaccines are recommended for teens, including the HPV vaccine. This vaccine prevents certain cancers and diseases, including cervical cancer, caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). The HPV vaccine is recommended for girls and boys starting at age 11 or 12 and can be given throughout your teen years. Another critical vaccine is the meningococcal conjugate vaccine, which protects against meningitis. Most teens need a booster at age 16, and it is essential for any teen heading off to college. Doctors recommend that teens get the influenza vaccine every year as flu season ramps up in October or November. Ask a parent or doctor about getting vaccinated. A simple shot can make for a healthy future.